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  • #37
    Originally posted by Xenos View Post

    They have a pretty good cap situation right now actually, with nice affordable signings like Justin Houston.
    That will come in handy within a year or two.

    Ballard and Company have draft chops, personnel chops second to none.

    This deeply talented young group will want to get paid.

    Thanks for you link to the inside story, X !!
    Get comfortable with being uncomfortable.
    LL Cool J

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    • #38
      Originally posted by Xenos View Post

      Well, I think the opposite problem is happening in the NFL where older more traditional management are stuck in their ways, and it's only now that data is catching on with a lot of teams. The better teams, like New England, know how to get that right balance.


      Besides, analytics is used more than just playcalling. It affects so many other important things like player health ie. how much recovery and hydration does a particular player need.
      You make a good point and we are on the same page in this I believe. I think if teams are not using analytics they are damaging their teams chances for success. On the other hand if they are only going by numbers and not using the sense they have developed in a life long study and playing in football they are also damaging their teams chances for success.

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      • #39
        The Ravens and their usage of analytics. DeCosta essentially explaining his reasoning for using analytics, even when teams are still trying to figure out what data is actually useful.
        https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.co...ia-peter-king/
        2. The DeCosta takeover. I've always been interested by Baltimore's ability to do things a different way. The Ravens were leaders in accumulating compensatory draft picks, and the league followed. The Ravens figured out that offensive linemen in spread systems were tortured acclimating to the NFL, so they made hay with mid-round Big Ten, pro-style linemen. Now they've got an analytics-savvy GM, Eric DeCosta, taking over for the legendary Ozzie Newsome, and he's great friends with the progressive Astros team that was hired to rebuild the Orioles--GM Mike Elias and assistant GM Sig Mejdal. "They question everything, and I love that," DeCosta said. This offseason, the Ravens put an ad on social media for an analytics hire. In baseball, analytics is the new wave. The NFL is still trying to figure it out. "We got hundreds, I mean hundreds, of applications," DeCosta said. The Ravens hired a 22-year-old woman who will try to make sense of the new data--including GPS tracking of players in practices and games. DeCosta is so protective of the Ravens' analytics plans that when I asked him how many analytics hires he had this year, he said, "More than one." And about the number of analytics employees in the organization? "Less than 10." DeCosta doesn't think analytics provides a magic formula, but that's not what he wants. He wants a small edge. A tiny edge. "We're looking for 1 percent, 2 percent, 3 percent advantages," he said. "There's no 50 percent edge anymore."
        Some other fun data from Football Outsiders:
        6. I think this is the time of year to get smart about football, and to be educated by some excellent football analytics people in our business. One is Aaron Schatz, who does yeoman's work on a staple of my preseason reading: a superb annual book called Football Outsiders Almanac. Strongly recommended. A few tidbits from the 2019 Football Outsiders Almanac:

        Tampa Bay had the most injured defense of any team since at least 2001, based on adjusted games lost (which accounts both for games missed and for games where players do play but are not 100 percent because they're injured). They had 92.0 adjusted games lost in 2018 on defense, from starters and important situational players. The average for the league was 36.1 adjusted games lost on defense.

        Arizona's passing game last year averaged just 2.7 yards after the catch on passes thrown past the line of scrimmage. No other offense was below 3.4 yards.

        Atlanta was the first team to keep its head coach but fire all three coordinators since the 1988-89 Indianapolis Colts under Ron Meyer.

        Based on "Approximate Value Over Replacement," the Ravens lost more veteran defensive talent than any defense since 2003 except for the 2009 Buccaneers. The previous 10 teams that lost the most defensive talent dropped an average of nine spots in Football Outsiders' defensive DVOA rankings.

        Seattle not only used six offensive linemen way more than any other team (20 percent of plays; the Colts were next at 10.5 percent) but the Seahawks were the only offense that used six linemen on at least 3 percent of plays.

        San Francisco used two players in the backfield on a league-leading 59 percent of running plays; New England and Pittsburgh were the only other offenses above 40 percent.

        Under Mike McCarthy, Green Bay faced an average of just 5.89 men in the box on offensive plays, lowest in the NFL. New Packers coach Matt LaFleur, in Tennessee, had the offense that faced the most average men in the box (6.60).

        Kansas City led the league last year with 163 penalties, including declined and offsetting. No other team was above 150. The Chiefs were first in defensive penalties and second in offensive penalties.

        Pittsburgh used less play-action than any other offense in the NFL (12 percent of passes) while every other offense was at 17 percent or more. This might be because--although the average NFL offense is much more efficient with play-action--Pittsburgh has been less efficient with play-action than without play-action for four straight years.

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        • #40
          Analytics says paying rb big money is the worst ROI.

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          • #41
            Originally posted by Xenos View Post
            The Ravens and their usage of analytics. DeCosta essentially explaining his reasoning for using analytics, even when teams are still trying to figure out what data is actually useful.
            https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.co...ia-peter-king/


            Some other fun data from Football Outsiders:
            The Seattle stat makes no sense. The only offense to use 6 lineman on 3% of plays but colts were next at 10.5%

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            • #42
              I wonder what the Ravens analytics have to say about their QB who just loves to turn the ball over? Jackson is like Santa Clause just giving gifts away left and right. In 7 games he had 3 picks and 12 fumbles losing 4 of them.

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              • #43
                Originally posted by chargerkdb View Post

                The Seattle stat makes no sense. The only offense to use 6 lineman on 3% of plays but colts were next at 10.5%
                The second sentence must be written incorrectly. Seattle is 20% to Colts' 10.5%.

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                • #44
                  Originally posted by FoutsFan View Post
                  I wonder what the Ravens analytics have to say about their QB who just loves to turn the ball over? Jackson is like Santa Clause just giving gifts away left and right. In 7 games he had 3 picks and 12 fumbles losing 4 of them.
                  That was Ozzie's last draft before DeCosta took over. So we'll see what will happen with Jackson. Although, they were probably happy about the wins and hope for second year improvements.

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