Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The Football Analytics Thread

Collapse
X
Collapse
First Prev Next Last
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #25
    Originally posted by Steve View Post

    Except that in the case of KC, I am not sure he is using analytics. I think he did what the analytics guys would do, but he was doing it for his reasons. He felt like we had the momentum, and he just felt like it was the thing to do, or at least that is how he was telling it after the game.

    A big part of what the Oakland A's were doing with Moneyball was getting away from conventional wisdom in baseball, and getting into being thoughtful about what they did. if that is the case of what the Chargers are going, then I think we are probably going down that line of thinking. However, I don't think they necessarily have an army of statisticians running around crunching numbers behind their decisions.
    According to SI in the first page, TT and Spanos use third party companies as opposed to having a full blown analytics department. Not sure how much has changed since that article was written.

    And yes, you're right in a sense about what Lynn did. I suppose the best coaches are the ones that can balance the gut instinct with the rational.

    Comment


    • #26
      Originally posted by Steve View Post

      Except that in the case of KC, I am not sure he is using analytics. I think he did what the analytics guys would do, but he was doing it for his reasons. He felt like we had the momentum, and he just felt like it was the thing to do, or at least that is how he was telling it after the game.

      A big part of what the Oakland A's were doing with Moneyball was getting away from conventional wisdom in baseball, and getting into being thoughtful about what they did. if that is the case of what the Chargers are going, then I think we are probably going down that line of thinking. However, I don't think they necessarily have an army of statisticians running around crunching numbers behind their decisions.
      Bringing in someone like Thomas Davis, an older, undervalued guy, is the most "Moneyball"-like move the Bolts have made.

      Comment


      • #27
        Originally posted by Xenos View Post

        According to SI in the first page, TT and Spanos use third party companies as opposed to having a full blown analytics department. Not sure how much has changed since that article was written.

        And yes, you're right in a sense about what Lynn did. I suppose the best coaches are the ones that can balance the gut instinct with the rational.
        And then there was Mike McCoy...
        We attempt to play modern defensive football.

        Comment


        • #28
          Originally posted by Topcat View Post

          Bringing in someone like Thomas Davis, an older, undervalued guy, is the most "Moneyball"-like move the Bolts have made.
          I expect Thomas to rub off well on Kyzir, Denzel, and Drue,
          aside from whatever tread there is remaining on him.
          We attempt to play modern defensive football.

          Comment


          • #29
            Originally posted by wu-dai clan View Post

            I expect Thomas to rub off well on Kyzir, Denzel, and Drue,
            aside from whatever tread there is remaining on him.
            They need to learn as much as they can especially about preparing mentally and PHYSICALLY as he has had such career longevity. They all need to learn to take care of their bodies.
            Tranquill sounds as if his preparation habits are at an elite level already.
            2019 Adopt - A - Bolt

            KYZIR WHITE

            CORTEZ BROUGHTON

            Comment


            • #30
              Besides an awesome read on the draft process with an actual GM, you get this little nugget from Chris Ballard about his analytics team.
              https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.co...ia-peter-king/
              Both our analytics guys, John Park and George Li, have voices in the room, too. They both offer great insight from an analytic perspective and we challenge the numbers when we don't like what we are hearing. It's always entertaining to watch guys get defensive when they are spitting out numbers depicting how a player would struggle.

              Comment


              • #31
                Originally posted by Xenos View Post
                Besides an awesome read on the draft process with an actual GM, you get this little nugget from Chris Ballard about his analytics team.
                https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.co...ia-peter-king/
                Insightful read. Hired a green beret as director of player development. Open unfiltered communication, tons of different backgrounds, and football intelligence/character are deciding factors.
                2019 Adopt - A - Bolt

                KYZIR WHITE

                CORTEZ BROUGHTON

                Comment


                • #32
                  I like analytics personally, if you mesh that with intensive background and psychological tests you're on your way to finding dominant football players.

                  I honestly don't get the stigma against it, I guess it's the whole "computers taking our jobs" thing.

                  Comment


                  • #33
                    Chris needs a good capologist.
                    We attempt to play modern defensive football.

                    Comment


                    • #34
                      Originally posted by Shock&Awe View Post
                      I like analytics personally, if you mesh that with intensive background and psychological tests you're on your way to finding dominant football players.

                      I honestly don't get the stigma against it, I guess it's the whole "computers taking our jobs" thing.
                      It has nothing to do with "computers taking our jobs" but has everything to do with a bunch of glorified fantasy football/baseball/basketball/hockey people telling real sports people to ignore what their eyes tell them and stickily go off a spreadsheet. Analytics are a great addition to running a team but you cannot let them be the end all be all.

                      Comment


                      • #35
                        Originally posted by FoutsFan View Post

                        It has nothing to do with "computers taking our jobs" but has everything to do with a bunch of glorified fantasy football/baseball/basketball/hockey people telling real sports people to ignore what their eyes tell them and stickily go off a spreadsheet. Analytics are a great addition to running a team but you cannot let them be the end all be all.
                        Well, I think the opposite problem is happening in the NFL where older more traditional management are stuck in their ways, and it's only now that data is catching on with a lot of teams. The better teams, like New England, know how to get that right balance.
                        The Kraft family's business-driven approach to running a franchise encompasses analytics--evident by the advent of the Jessica Gelman-led Kraft Analytics group--and the team has been analytics-heavy in cap management since they bought the team. Bill Belichick uses 64-year-old ex-Wall Street trader Ernie Adams in that area. And while the team is seen as an innovator, it's not like there's a large football analytics staff. Rather, the coaches and scouts are all responsible for integrating data provided for them into their work. Belichick is known for giving members of his football staff projects that would fall under the analytics heading.
                        Besides, analytics is used more than just playcalling. It affects so many other important things like player health ie. how much recovery and hydration does a particular player need.

                        Comment


                        • #36
                          Originally posted by wu-dai clan View Post
                          Chris needs a good capologist.
                          They have a pretty good cap situation right now actually, with nice affordable signings like Justin Houston.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X